The Port of Gothenburg in the lead at COP27 when shipping is to be decarbonized

Three Port of Gothenburg projects for a green transformation of shipping have been selected by the Swedish government to constitute Sweden’s contribution to the international initiative Green Shipping Challenge. The initiative is led by the US and Norway and was launched earlier this week at the COP27 climate summit in Sharm-el-Sheikh.

“We are proud to be able to contribute to Sweden’s commitments at COP27 with concrete projects that lead to actual emission reduction, and which can also show the way for other ports,” says Edvard Molitor, Head of International Public Affairs and Sustainability at the Gothenburg Port Authority.

After COP26 in Glasgow, the USA took the initiative for the Green Shipping Challenge, which is to encourage countries and other actors to present concrete commitments so that the international shipping sector can contribute to reaching the 1.5 degree target.

“It is important for the decarbonisation to reduce emissions from shipping. Swedish shipping is already well ahead in the transition and this initiative gives Swedish companies the opportunity to compete and contribute to the global transition,” says the Swedish minister for Infrastructure and Housing Andreas Carlson in an official statement.

Sweden has presented three commitments to stimulate the transition to green shipping. All of these are collaborations involving the Port of Gothenburg. The first concerns the development of a green corridor between Sweden and Belgium. The second is an industry-wide collaboration that will make Gothenburg’s port Europe’s first hub for green electrofuel. The third commitment concerns the cooperation on a green corridor between the Port of Gothenburg and the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands.

“The Port of Gothenburg has been conducting a very ambitious climate work for many years, and it is gratifying that we can now put even more of this into practice by creating new green corridors based on alternative fuels for shipping that significantly reduce emissions,” says Edvard Molitor.